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September 12, 2017 – From National Review – Last month, the New York Times “The Upshot” blog ran a piece by Aaron Carroll, a professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. With this piece, Carroll became the latest in a long line of liberal critics of abstinence-based sex-education programs. He mentions that funding for abstinence-based programs increased during the George W. Bush administration. He then cites a number of meta-studies, which purport to show that abstinence-only sex-education classes are ineffective at either reducing or delaying teen sexual activity.

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Programs aren’t “magic bullets,” say researchers

 

Atlanta, December 16, 2016 –New research conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) shows that many “evidence-based” sex education programs are not actually effective, even though they have been promoted as such.  According to this in-depth evaluation, published in the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), “most of the programs had small or insignificant impacts on adolescent behavior.” In fact, 80% of the students in these “evidence-based” programs fared no better or no worse than their peers who were not in the programs. Further, teens in some “evidence-based” programs were even more likely to begin having sex, more likely to engage in oral sex, and more likely to get pregnant than those who were not in the program.

Atlanta, June 29, 2016 — The CDC’s recent release of the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance indicated that youth across the U.S. are now less likely to have sex than they were 20 years ago. In fact, today nearly 60% of high school students nationwide have not had sex, an increase of 28% since 1991.1

Atlanta, August 11, 2014 — Local educators in Monroe County Georgia were pleased to see the latest statistics showing dramatic declines in teen pregnancy in their community.  From 2003 to 2010, pregnancy rates among 15 to 17 year olds in Monroe County declined from 30.5 to 13.3, a 56% reduction in teen pregnancy.[1]

February 24, 2014 – From LoyolaPhoenix.com – It is unfortunate that the recent PHOENIX editorial (“Loyola leaves students sexually unprotected”) on sexual health did not even mention abstinence. Instead, the Editorial Board decided to abdicate personal responsibility and argue that is the job of an educational institution to make sure its students have birth control (even though the editorial pointed out how easily accessible it is). Since the Editorial Board decided not to offer abstinence as a viable way to avoid STDs and unplanned pregnancies, I gladly will.

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